7. Steps to a clean colon

In his book Diet & Salad, Dr Norman Walker stressed the importance of eating raw foods and those that were actually compatible with each other – plus 2 more essentials:

  1. Having raw, fresh vegetable juices (mixed in a proper juicer, not one that pulverises and liquifies):

‘ … this is the most satisfactory way to extract all of the vitamins, enzymes, amino acids and minerals from the vegetables … the rebuilding and regenerating properties in the juices are the quickest means by which the body can be brought back to a normal condition.’1

Walker recommends approx. 500mls per serving, diluted if you prefer, at least 30 minutes before meals. But his favourite is carrot juice:

‘ … raw carrot juice stands supreme. It is a particularly wonderful cleanser of bile and waste matter accumulated in the liver as a result of years of wrong eating.2

2. Having colonic irrigations

Simply put, a proper colonic irrigation (or ‘hydration’ as it’s now known) flushes low-pressured filtered water into the colon through a sterilised tube attached to a speculum. Faecal matter and gas blockages are removed from the colon through a second tube. The process takes about 30 minutes to an hour. 

‘ … Like the removal of plaster, the faecal coating of the colon must be thoroughly soaked and saturated in order that its removal may take place gradually, comfortably and effectively.

‘ … every man and woman, if they have any desire to live a long and healthy life should seriously consider taking a series of colonic irrigations and get started on this cleansing program … thereafter, about twice a year, throughout life, colonic irrigations should help keep the body healthy.’3

To have my ‘impacted faecal matter’ removed appealed to me. Now, what about you?

I did want to live a long life without the chronic conditions of old age. Reading this in 1981, I was reluctant if not somewhat prudish to have my colon irrigated.  

Lying on a bed, no underwear, with a tube up my backside? No way. 

But as I write this in late 2020, I’m 71, and … THE GUT IS IN!!

We now see bowel screening kits promoted on TV; poo transplants effectively treating bacterial gut infections and metabolic syndrome, with recipients improving insulin sensitivity to better control blood sugar; cafes and juice bars promoting ‘gut cleanser’ drinks; and pills, fibre supplements and cereals claiming to produce a ‘healthy gut’ …

I pulled out my folder of Paula Goodyer’s articles. Paula had weekly Saturday columns on nutrition in the Sydney Morning Herald; everything she wrote was worth keeping. I recall reading her article ‘More than a Gut Feeling’ in 2012. She said: 

‘ … microbes in our gut may contribute to hard-to-treat problems such as allergies, autoimmune disease, irritable bowel syndrome and even obesity and diabetes.’

Healthy living at 98 West Aussie great-grandma Elsie in 2020 

Paula quoted Prof. Tom Brody, a Sydney gastroenterologist, who said dietary fibre provides food to help good microbes flourish.

Has my ‘regime’ blessed me with good microbes? 

I believe it has. Thirty-five years of diligent timing and selection of food plus regular exercise have kept my weight stable. I have normal blood pressure, low cholesterol, and excellent urine and blood tests.   

But would I feel this good in 10, or even 20 years? 

Dr Walker died in his sleep at 99. In the Foreword to Colon Health, he wrote: 

‘ … I am never conscious of my age. … I have never been aware of being any older, and I can say, … that I feel more alive, alert, and full of enthusiasm today than … when I was 30 years old. … my best years are ahead … I never think of birthdays, nor … celebrate them. … I am enjoying vibrant health, I don’t mind telling people how old I am: I AM AGELESS!’4

Folks, I’m now heading to my third colonic.

 1Walker, N.W. (1940/1970). Diet & Salad, pp.40–41. Norwalk Press: Summertown, Tennessee.

2Walker, Diet & Salad, p.118.

3Walker, N.W. (1979). Colon Health: The key to a vibrant life, p.21. O’Sullivan Woodside & Co: Phoenix, Arizona.

4Walker, Colon Health, iii.

Share your thoughts on our Let’s Talk page

8. My first (two) colonics